My Folks Call

Lordy, Lordy, I git to talk in another language
and my children git to listen. Ev’ry time I pick
up the phone, I pick up that twang, as if I were
the one with a drawl. My kids say I git real “slow
and Southern,” even though Kansas ain’t nowhere
near Southern. She’s ’bout as middle of the road as
you can git. And she’s just as beautiful a place
you’d ever wanna see too– Abilene, Abilene,
purtiest town you’d ever seen. Ah, you’d think I’d
of been a preacher, the way I git to talking with
such a swell of love and tenderness in my throat.
Home’s kinda like that, I guess, sneaking out from
your insides without any coaxing at all. I sure hope
that when my folks quit calling, on account of them
being gone, there’s still a sweet swell in my throat.

day 18 NaPoWriMo
and linking with Real Toads

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34 thoughts on “My Folks Call

  1. changes, changes, even when we are dealing with them, we still wont look forward with certainty to the ones to come, instinctively we know its a case of more adjustments

    have a good week

    much love…

  2. Deelightful! You got the hick smack down pat. And loved “Home’s kinda like that, I guess, sneaking out from / your insides without any coaxing at all.” A treat for the ear that brings a tear to the eye.

  3. This choked me up, for some reason:
    “Home’s kinda like that, I guess, sneaking out from
    your insides without any coaxing at all.”

    I love the voice you’ve invoked here.

  4. I felt melancholy reading this, I used to return to the vernacular of my youth when my folks called, now they are gone and so is my old voice. Thank you for bringing the memory back to me. So well done 🙂

  5. Pingback: Day Nineteen
  6. I love this poem! Reading your poem, I couldn’t help but read with a twang! I also read softer and slower (I read it aloud, it seemed appropriate considering the prompt). Obviously this poem was spectacular in a soft, southern way (even if Kansas is more central than southern).

  7. As a native of Kentucky with people in Tennessee, I admire your re-creation of the talk. And I think this is how preachers should talk “with/such a swell of love and tenderness in my throat.” Thanks for this experience, Angie!–Christopher

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